Invasives in the News

As part of the ongoing response to the recent discovery of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) within the state, Vermont has joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s 31-state quarantine boundary. The quarantine will help reduce the movement of infested ash wood to un-infested regions outside of Vermont’s borders. Ash wood may not be moved from Vermont to Maine, Rhode Island, or 5 counties in New Hampshire because the pest has not been identified in these states and counties. Vermont will be directing available resources to protect state forest health by providing Vermonters with low-risk options for use and disposal of wood that is already infested.

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A public access greeter performs a watercraft decontamination.

Vermont DEC unveils training schedule for Public Access Greeter Program in 2018.

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the flowers of a dame's rocket plant, showing four petals and pink/purple in color, are gathered in a cluster

As winter ends, and spring begins, and we look forward to May, we can start to learn invasive plants that are common early bloomers.

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The emerald ash borer, which is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees around the country has now been discovered in Barre, Groton, and Plainfield. It was first detected in Orange. The news has many public and industry officials around the state preparing for what's to come.

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ourVTwoods.org is a new comprehensive digital resource about Vermont’s forests. The website serves as a portal for partner coordination and a hub for information on forest health, stewardship, and the Vermont forest economy. We invite you to be part of the online ourVTwoods.org community and share the news that ourVTwoods.org is live.

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The Vermont Department of Forests, Parks & Recreation  and the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Foods & Markets report that emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive forest insect from Asia, has been detected in Vermont. Officials with the USDA Animal & Plant Health and Inspection Service have confirmed the identification of a beetle recently found in northern Orange County, Vermont. The insect was reported through the vtinvasives.org website.

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In a state where agriculture and forestry are important industries, the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is not a welcomed guest. First discovered in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014, the colorful invasive from China poses a threat to timber, viticulture, fruit and nursery businesses. By the end of 2017, nearly 3,000 square miles of the state have been affected.   

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The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department responded to an angler report of an unusual fish in his bait bucket, and eventually cited a Vermont baitfish wholesaler for illegally importing an unapproved fish species into the state.

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This is part three (final) in a three-part series on how to create an invasive plant management plan. This section will guide you through assessing and mapping options for everyday landowners.

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In Pennsylvania, where emerald ash borer has been present since 2007, municipalities have found successful ash-management plans under guidance of the state's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and they offer a model for other regions to follow. A new guide outlines a set of four options for communities to choose from as they plan for the impact of the emerald ash borer.

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Scientists are debating whether and why it appears that the number of species at sites worldwide is holding steady (even increasing at many), as biodiversity declines globally.

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"Ohio is taking a swing at nature’s bullies.

Under new rules that went into effect Sunday, the sale and distribution of 38 destructive, invasive plant species will become illegal.

In its list, the state agriculture department included various types of honeysuckles, Bradford pear trees, autumn olive shrubs and fig buttercup flowers that line freeways, coat forest floors and choke wild spaces across Ohio.........................."

Author Credit: By Marion Renault, The Columbus Dispatch

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A public access greeter with a watercraft decontamination station

Funding for aquatic nuisance species management projects for the upcoming year is now available through the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation.

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It may be hard to believe, but the emerald ash borer or "EAB" has not been found in Vermont yet. It surrounds us on all of our borders and has taken up residence in 31 states and three Canadian provinces. In case you are feeling out of the loop, here are some great resources to help you stay up to date and prepare for the arrival of EAB. 

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The winter of 2016- 2017 was a good one for hemlock woolly adelgids (HWA) in Vermont, which is probably bad news for hemlock trees. The adelgid is an invasive forest insect that attacks hemlock trees and was first discovered in Vermont in 2007. Last winter’s HWA mortality rate was only 65%, compared to 99 – 97% for the previous three years. Forest health staff with the Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation are seeking volunteers to help survey for HWA.

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