Invasives in the News

July 8, 2019

There has been a new detection of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in Derby Line, Vermont. This is the first confirmed detection in Orleans County.

Read more

June 5, 2019

Young Forest, the forest type that is dominated by dense shrubs and trees less than 20 years old, is an extremely important cover type for wildlife in Vermont. More than 60 wildlife species – including mammals, birds, reptiles, and insects – need young forest to survive.

Read more

Multiflora rose overgrowing a field and trees.

May 29, 2019

When recalling a drive down a dusty country road, you might remember seeing round green shrubs speckled with small white flowers, in otherwise empty grazing paddocks, or along farm fields. This plant is called multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) and is a perennial shrub within the Rose family, Rosaceae. The name, multiflora, means “many flowered”, and its nickname, “rambler rose” perhaps comes from its tendency to spread from cane or seed.

Read more

May 28, 2019

Although you might think we already have our fair share of forest health issues to deal with here, it’s time for Vermont to start thinking about yet another forest disease on the horizon – oak wilt. Oak wilt affects the vascular systems of oak trees and is caused by the fungus Bretziella fagacearum (formerly Ceratocystis fagacearum). Although there is still debate on whether this fungus occurs naturally here in North America or has been introduced from elsewhere, one thing not up for debate is that this fungus is a tree killer. 

Read more

March 14, 2019

Winter walks through the woods can reveal many things to us—the tracks of our wildlife neighbors, the contours of the landscape, and with a practiced eye, the overwintering branches of woody understory plants like honeysuckle.

Read more

March 14, 2019

Owning land can be hard work, and it can cost landowners a lot of money to properly manage land for forest health and quality wildlife habitat. To help relieve some of the financial burden of some land management activities, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) offers the cost-share Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for landowners throughout Vermont.

Read more

January 24, 2019

The Vermont Urban & Community Forestry Program is partnering with the Young Writers Project to raise awareness about emerald ash borer and its impact on Vermont forests and communities. 

Read more

January 17, 2019

The 2018 Vermont Habitat Stamp Annual Report, released earlier this winter, highlights the conservation power of the multiplier effect – where one action can be a catalyst for other actions and the effects keep radiating out. This past year, over $110,000 were raised from donations and were then used to leverage an additional $143,000 in federal funds. This created a total reserve of over $253,000 to be used for habitat conservation by the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Read more

Middle school volunteers learning how to use a weed wrench from FPR staff in Richmond, VT.

January 16, 2019

The growing season for 2018 saw many projects across the state tackling the forest, field, and wetland health issue of non-native invasive plants. Below are highlights of some of these amazing local efforts. Huge thanks to everyone who is working toward making our Vermont landscapes healthier and more resilient, and protecting them for generations to come.

Read more

November 7, 2018

These grants will support efforts to prepare for and manage the impacts of emerald ash borer (EAB). EAB is a destructive and invasive forest pest that feeds on all species of ash trees, killing over 99% within four years of infestation. The state's forested land is made up of about 5% ash, yet up to 50% of downtown trees in Vermont are ash. All said, Vermont is home to an estimated 160 million ash trees. EAB is now confirmed in Orange, Washington, Caledonia, Grand Isle, and Bennington Counties. Communities statewide are encouraged to prepare to manage the decline of ash trees and the future of an urban tree canopy without ash.

Read more

November 6, 2018

USDA APHIS is proposing to end the federal emerald ash borer (EAB) quarantine. As indicated in the announcement below, USDA is taking comments on the proposed “deregulation”.

Read more

VTDEC Technician holds a sampling rake full of Hydrilla

November 6, 2018

Hydrilla, touted as the worst aquatic invasive species, was recently found in a waterbody that is hydrologically connected to Vermont in the Connecticut River. As part of an Early Detection and Rapid Response, VTDEC staff joined state biologists from Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire to sample sections of the river in Connecticut to survey the extent of the infestation.  

Read more

October 10, 2018

The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed that insects collected from ash trees in South Hero, VT are larvae of the emerald ash borer (EAB). This location is about fifty miles from the closest confirmed EAB infestation in Vermont. This invasive insect was first discovered in Vermont in February, and has also been confirmed in Orange, Washington, Caledonia, and Bennington counties.

Read more

Euonymus europaeus has orange arils with pink capsules

October 8, 2018

European spindle tree (Euonymus europaeus) is a member of the spindle tree family (Celastraceae), which includes species that are also invasive to North America like burning bush (Euonymus alatus) and Asiatic bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). Species within the spindle tree family are woody shrubs or woody vines, all which have brightly colored flesh (arils) around the seeds ranging from reds to oranges. These fruits appear on the European spindle tree in the late summer and early fall.

Read more

August 22, 2018

Zebra mussels have been confirmed in the Canadian waters of Lake Memphremagog.

Read more