Invasives in the News

August 22, 2018

Zebra mussels have been confirmed in the Canadian waters of Lake Memphremagog.

Read more

August 21, 2018

We're hiring!

Join the VT Urban & Community Forestry team as the Forest Pest Education Coordinator!
 

Read more

Photo: Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org Purple loosestrife can reach heights of several meters.

August 9, 2018

If you’ve ever spent a late August afternoon along a lake with a reedy shoreline, you may have noticed the brilliant, beautiful purple flowers of this month’s focal plant: purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).

Read more

two restoration crew members pose next to a wild parsnip that is taller than them both (6 feet tall or more).

August 9, 2018

In mid-summer, Vermont starts to see a wave of yellow flowers bloom along roads, fields, meadows, and trails. This plant is called Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) and is similar in appearance to Queen Ann’s Lace (Daucus carota). Wild Parsnip is a member of the carrot family (Apiaceae), and is currently considered taxonomically indistinct from the common garden parsnip.

Read more

August 3, 2018

Officials say the invasive pest the emerald ash borer has been found in the southern Vermont town of Stamford. The location is within five miles of a location in North Adams, Massachusetts, where the insect was also recently discovered.

Read more

Beetles released onto purple loosestrife plants

July 9, 2018

Biological control of purple loosestrife is being attempted in Pa. wetlands.

Read more

The flowers of Wild Chervil form in clusters called an umbel, almost resembling an umbrella.

June 27, 2018

Many invasive plants in Vermont start blooming in May. Keep an eye out for one obvious bloomer this time of year, Wild Chervil (Anthriscus sylvestris), or also commonly called “cow parsley”. This invasive plant can be seen alongside roads, and is notable in our rolling Vermont fields. This is a biennial herbaceous plant within the carrot family, Apiaceae. In Vermont, there are two introduced Anthriscus species documented outside of cultivation, and include Wild Chervil and its close relative, Garden Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium). The name, Chervil, comes perhaps from Latin and Greek roots, collectively meaning “leaf to enjoy”.

Read more

middle school students pose in front of the wooded area where they just removed invasive plants

June 27, 2018

The floodplain forest in Richmond rang out with the excitement and hard work of 50 5th graders. In teams, the students worked to remove a non-native invasive plant—honeysuckle. Their ranks were led by community volunteer, Jon Kart, and the team members of VT Forests, Parks & Recreation’s Invasive Plants Program (VTIPP).

Read more

June 27, 2018

The invasive emerald ash borer has been found in Montpelier. City officials are taking steps to protect some trees along city streets, but ultimately they say most of Montpelier’s ash trees will die.

Read more

June 26, 2018

The invasive tree-killer that’s alarming Vermont forestry officials could cost the town of Hartford alone hundreds of thousands of dollars, according to early projections by Tree Warden Brad Goedkoop.

Read more

A Vermont Fish and Wildlife Warden discusses aquatic invasive species laws.

June 26, 2018

The Vermont Agency of Natural Resources is poised to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species this summer.

Read more

June 20, 2018

There are at least 50 species of non-native insects established in the state, including the Emerald Ash Borer, which has devastated the local ash tree population. Poised to join this list is another wood-boring bug, which could have a similar impact on more of New Hampshire’s trees: the Southern Pine Beetle.

Read more

May 30, 2018

Officials at the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry (DACF) report that emerald ash borer (EAB) has been found in Maine. Despite an aggressive search for at least a decade, the destructive forest insect from Asia had not been detected in Maine previously. It has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in thirty-four states throughout the country. The estimated commercial (unprocessed) value of Maine ash trees is approximately $320 million.

Read more

May 21, 2018

After years trying to stop the spread across state lines of an invasive beetle that destroys trees, the federal government looks about ready to give up.

The Department of Agriculture will soon propose abandoning an emerald ash borer quarantine that restricts the movement of firewood and items from ash trees, putting new emphasis on biological controls and other approaches that don't require federal regulations and, the agency said, may be more effective.

Read more

May 17, 2018

Training dates for this year's Vermont Invasive Patroller trainings, hosted by the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, have been set.

Read more