Invasives in the News

March 14, 2019

Winter walks through the woods can reveal many things to us—the tracks of our wildlife neighbors, the contours of the landscape, and with a practiced eye, the overwintering branches of woody understory plants like honeysuckle.

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March 14, 2019

Owning land can be hard work, and it can cost landowners a lot of money to properly manage land for forest health and quality wildlife habitat. To help relieve some of the financial burden of some land management activities, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) offers the cost-share Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) for landowners throughout Vermont.

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January 24, 2019

The Vermont Urban & Community Forestry Program is partnering with the Young Writers Project to raise awareness about emerald ash borer and its impact on Vermont forests and communities. 

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January 17, 2019

The 2018 Vermont Habitat Stamp Annual Report, released earlier this winter, highlights the conservation power of the multiplier effect – where one action can be a catalyst for other actions and the effects keep radiating out. This past year, over $110,000 were raised from donations and were then used to leverage an additional $143,000 in federal funds. This created a total reserve of over $253,000 to be used for habitat conservation by the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife.

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Middle school volunteers learning how to use a weed wrench from FPR staff in Richmond, VT.

January 16, 2019

The growing season for 2018 saw many projects across the state tackling the forest, field, and wetland health issue of non-native invasive plants. Below are highlights of some of these amazing local efforts. Huge thanks to everyone who is working toward making our Vermont landscapes healthier and more resilient, and protecting them for generations to come.

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November 7, 2018

These grants will support efforts to prepare for and manage the impacts of emerald ash borer (EAB). EAB is a destructive and invasive forest pest that feeds on all species of ash trees, killing over 99% within four years of infestation. The state's forested land is made up of about 5% ash, yet up to 50% of downtown trees in Vermont are ash. All said, Vermont is home to an estimated 160 million ash trees. EAB is now confirmed in Orange, Washington, Caledonia, Grand Isle, and Bennington Counties. Communities statewide are encouraged to prepare to manage the decline of ash trees and the future of an urban tree canopy without ash.

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November 6, 2018

USDA APHIS is proposing to end the federal emerald ash borer (EAB) quarantine. As indicated in the announcement below, USDA is taking comments on the proposed “deregulation”.

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VTDEC Technician holds a sampling rake full of Hydrilla

November 6, 2018

Hydrilla, touted as the worst aquatic invasive species, was recently found in a waterbody that is hydrologically connected to Vermont in the Connecticut River. As part of an Early Detection and Rapid Response, VTDEC staff joined state biologists from Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire to sample sections of the river in Connecticut to survey the extent of the infestation.  

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October 10, 2018

The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed that insects collected from ash trees in South Hero, VT are larvae of the emerald ash borer (EAB). This location is about fifty miles from the closest confirmed EAB infestation in Vermont. This invasive insect was first discovered in Vermont in February, and has also been confirmed in Orange, Washington, Caledonia, and Bennington counties.

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Euonymus europaeus has orange arils with pink capsules

October 8, 2018

European spindle tree (Euonymus europaeus) is a member of the spindle tree family (Celastraceae), which includes species that are also invasive to North America like burning bush (Euonymus alatus) and Asiatic bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). Species within the spindle tree family are woody shrubs or woody vines, all which have brightly colored flesh (arils) around the seeds ranging from reds to oranges. These fruits appear on the European spindle tree in the late summer and early fall.

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August 22, 2018

Zebra mussels have been confirmed in the Canadian waters of Lake Memphremagog.

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Photo: Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org Purple loosestrife can reach heights of several meters.

August 9, 2018

If you’ve ever spent a late August afternoon along a lake with a reedy shoreline, you may have noticed the brilliant, beautiful purple flowers of this month’s focal plant: purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).

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two restoration crew members pose next to a wild parsnip that is taller than them both (6 feet tall or more).

August 9, 2018

In mid-summer, Vermont starts to see a wave of yellow flowers bloom along roads, fields, meadows, and trails. This plant is called Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) and is similar in appearance to Queen Ann’s Lace (Daucus carota). Wild Parsnip is a member of the carrot family (Apiaceae), and is currently considered taxonomically indistinct from the common garden parsnip.

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August 3, 2018

Officials say the invasive pest the emerald ash borer has been found in the southern Vermont town of Stamford. The location is within five miles of a location in North Adams, Massachusetts, where the insect was also recently discovered.

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Beetles released onto purple loosestrife plants

July 9, 2018

Biological control of purple loosestrife is being attempted in Pa. wetlands.

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