Invasives in the News

November 22, 2019

White-tailed deer are deeply rooted in our landscape and our state’s identity. They are a native species and play an important role in our ecosystem. However, transformations in our forest structure from centuries of land use changes, the removal of predator species like the gray wolf and mountain lion, and a warming climate have cumulatively allowed for deer to expand their range and increase their population in our state. Increased sprawl and suburbanization have also put these habitat generalists into our backyards and lives more than most people would like. Unfortunately, whether it be in the form of vehicle collisions, garden and landscape damage, or the increased prevalence of Lyme disease, negative encounters with deer are becoming more common for people in Vermont.

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Glossy buckthorn leaves have a smooth margin, are oval to elliptical in shape, and have veins that run out to leaf edge from the mid-rib.

November 20, 2019

The colder temps and flurries of snow may make plant identification a thing of dreams for the coming summer. But one common invasive plant in Vermont can still be easily spotted throughout the winter months: common buckthorn.

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Germinated water chestnut (Trapa natans) sprout intercepted at Lake Bomoseen in July 2019.

November 20, 2019

2019 Vermont Public Access Greeters successfully stop new infestations of aquatic invasive species from entering lakes and ponds throughout Vermont.

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October 18, 2019

It is hard to believe that the Forest Hero! Network is fast approaching its 1st birthday! To celebrate, we'd like to share with everyone, the good work that volunteers are completing in their communities. If you are working on a project and would like to help inspire others who may be seeking ideas, please write in and we'll share in future newsletters! 

To learn more about the Network, and if you’d like to learn about other training opportunities, stay tuned to this website: https://vtinvasives.org/forest-hero-network

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October 10, 2019

In September, a new emerald ash borer infestation was found in Londonderry, VT.

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September 26, 2019

Amur Maple, Acer ginnala, belongs to the Sapindaceae family, which now includes previous members of Aceraceae (maple family). It is native to northern China and Japan, and was introduced into North America in 1860. Beginning in the 1950s, Amur Maple was reported as “locally established”.

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September 26, 2019

On a sunny evening in May, about 30 environmental practitioners from around Vermont gathered at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center, where the snow had just about melted. As loons called on Big Hosmer Pond, and the worlds of natural resource regulation, conservation, and education clicked on outside, this group spent two days immersed in a concept that is at once head-smackingly simple and deceptively complex: a land ethic.

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VYCC

September 26, 2019

Water Chestnut is an annual aquatic plant that is invasive in Vermont. The water chestnut population has been managed by the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (VTDEC) since the early 1980s and, for the past few summers, crews from the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps (VYCC) have been supporting VTDEC’s hand-pulling efforts.

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July 19, 2019

Vermonters know that our hot and humid summer weather has really settled in once our fields and roadsides start popping out in colorful blooms of chicory, Queen Anne’s lace, black-eyed Susan, orange hawkweed, and feral daylilies. It’s a beautiful time of year in our state, and it’s also a time of year when our songbirds start fattening up for their winter migration and our native pollinators begin to collect and store pollen and nectar for their young to feed on over the winter.

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July 19, 2019

As we progress into summer heat waves and holiday vacations, many plants have flowered and started to go to seed. One invasive plant, Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), at this point in the season (July/August) will have seeds forming and ripening.

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July 8, 2019

There has been a new detection of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in Derby Line, Vermont. This is the first confirmed detection in Orleans County.

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June 5, 2019

Young Forest, the forest type that is dominated by dense shrubs and trees less than 20 years old, is an extremely important cover type for wildlife in Vermont. More than 60 wildlife species – including mammals, birds, reptiles, and insects – need young forest to survive.

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Multiflora rose overgrowing a field and trees.

May 29, 2019

When recalling a drive down a dusty country road, you might remember seeing round green shrubs speckled with small white flowers, in otherwise empty grazing paddocks, or along farm fields. This plant is called multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) and is a perennial shrub within the Rose family, Rosaceae. The name, multiflora, means “many flowered”, and its nickname, “rambler rose” perhaps comes from its tendency to spread from cane or seed.

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May 28, 2019

Although you might think we already have our fair share of forest health issues to deal with here, it’s time for Vermont to start thinking about yet another forest disease on the horizon – oak wilt. Oak wilt affects the vascular systems of oak trees and is caused by the fungus Bretziella fagacearum (formerly Ceratocystis fagacearum). Although there is still debate on whether this fungus occurs naturally here in North America or has been introduced from elsewhere, one thing not up for debate is that this fungus is a tree killer. 

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March 14, 2019

Winter walks through the woods can reveal many things to us—the tracks of our wildlife neighbors, the contours of the landscape, and with a practiced eye, the overwintering branches of woody understory plants like honeysuckle.

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