News On Vermont Invasives

Below, you'll find news about the initiatives of our partnerships. You can also see upcoming events in our calendar or subscribe to our newsletter to receive updates on our work.

Monday, December 7, 2015

For some time there have been reports of “hot spots” of red pine mortality across our region.  An effort funded by the US Forest Service and led by a graduate student from UNH is looking into the situation and beginning to find some clues.  While the team continues to look at a variety of possible causal agents, one result of this research is that red pine scale (RPS) has been...

Monday, December 7, 2015

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica), native to Eastern Asia, was introduced to North America in the late 1800s as an ornamental plant. This plant is found in most U.S. states, and many countries worldwide, exhibiting invasive behavior outside of Asia*.

Japanese knotweed was identified in Vermont as early as the 1920s**. In the wake of Tropical Storm Irene, Vermont...

Thursday, December 3, 2015

For years, Didymosphenia geminata (Didymo, for short) has been on many states’ high-priority aquatic invasive species lists. Didymo, a freshwater diatom, has the potential to form dense mats on stream and river bottoms, making...

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Clint McFarland didn’t want to believe the pictures he was looking at on his smartphone.
A Worcester, Mass., neighborhood before ALB-infested tree removal

Monday, November 23, 2015

"BOISE, Idaho — 

Finding a way to stop fire-prone cheatgrass and other invasive species is unavoidable if sagebrush ecosystems in the West are to remain viable for native plants and animals, experts say.

More than 200 federal and state land managers and scientists trying to figure out how to do that took part in the three-day 2015 Western Invasive Weed Summit that wrapped up...

Thursday, November 19, 2015

A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont has been proposed.

The rule is scheduled to go into effect on May 1, 2016.

More information about this rule, and about opportunities for public input, is at this link: http://fpr.vermont.gov...

Thursday, November 19, 2015

"Going for a walk the other day along a public trail I was struck by the number of invasive shrubs I saw. Most trees and shrubs have shed their leaves, but burning bush (Euonymus alatus), Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii) and honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.) still have leaves on their branches. Holding leaves and producing food by photosynthesis gives them extra energy to take over the world...

Friday, November 6, 2015

By Jeff Malachowski/Daily News Staff

    MARLBOROUGH – State Conservation and Recreation officials came up nearly empty in their efforts to catch Asian long-horned beetles in more than 1,000 traps set across MetroWest and Worcester County, a good sign the destructive pest has not spread.

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

By DIANE BRONCACCIO

SHELBURNE CENTER, Massachusetts — It was only a year ago that Norman and Lisa Davenport first noticed sunlight flickering through the once-dense shade of a stand of hemlocks on their hilltop farmland.

And now those first trees look more like utility poles than conifers.

As the twin evils of elongate hemlock scale and hemlock woolly adelgid spread...

Friday, October 23, 2015

"On Tuesday, members of the Sterling College community spread out around their Craftsbury campus for an all college work day focused on removing invasive plants. Even if you don't have an army of college students to battle your Japanese knotweed, you can still join the fight against invasive plants in Vermont.